every day is a different warning
just a normal disgusting human meatbag here. definitely not a sleeper agent for the secret robot insurrection sent to destroy you all. herein: comics, comedy and other crap.


benito-cereno:

Some time last year, Kyle Starks (robotmountain) and I had a bet, the stakes of which were that if I won, he would draw a Doom Patrol comic, and if I lost, I would write a story of his choosing.

Long story short, we both kind of won and lost, so the compromise is that I would write a Doom Patrol comic that he drew.

This is that comic. Please share it if you like it.

<3,

Benito

Tomorrow!

Tomorrow!

failed-mad-scientist:

Jenny Sparks - Ron Salas

failed-mad-scientist:

Jenny Sparks - Ron Salas

kierongillen:

In the aftermath of the Dazzler synopsis, I was talking on twitter about retro-pop dance stuff, specifically the 2001-or-so vintage.

Not that it started in 2001, but the time and the place. I take it all from around here, with the flicker of Daft Punk’s future after their Homework here…

I fucking adore this. I’m what Tom Ewing describes as an indie dancer - I’m someone who prefers dance to songs rather than the endless groove of someone who truly loves dance music rather than a pop-leaning dilettante.

twentypercentcooler:

Thieves stole Rockford’s pants.

twentypercentcooler:

Thieves stole Rockford’s pants.

davebardin:

Day two of “A Headshot a Day in the Month of May.”  Today’s headshot: Nightcrawler.  

davebardin:

Day two of “A Headshot a Day in the Month of May.”  Today’s headshot: Nightcrawler.  

batmanfights:

Me, every day.

adamwarrock:

If I had it my way, the categorization of “nerd” or “geek” would be a protected class, would be on the tip of the tongue of everyone talking about social integration and comfort indices for students in high schools, colleges, job culture, etc. 
Because the culture and environment that raises “nerds or geeks” first, comes from a lifetime of isolation, loneliness, often stemming from a reaction from family trauma or great personal bullying and/or torment. They find comfort in culture, and find others who feel the same and quote the same jokes, reenact the same scenes, it’s not unlike religion - in that we find comfort in people who share our same passions, we feel less alone, as if there’s a whole world of people who are our friends after being convinced for so long that no one would ever be our friends. 
As a 33 year old person, I have terrible anxiety, social anxiety, OCD, at times agoraphobia, panic, and have the unfortunate ability to completely emotionally disconnect myself from any situation. Some of these things, I’ve only discovered I suffer from in the past 5 years of my life, long after I graduated any kind of school. I wish someone had been around to tell me that the things I suffered from were treatable, or rather, that the things I felt were normal. I wish there was some kind of mechanism for me to get help, rather than sift through a booklet of therapists, and read books and articles online to find ways to put myself through behavioral therapy and take active steps to making myself healthier. Not everyone has access to help. Not everyone has the initiative to take steps to be healthier. A lot of people sit and just assume that the way they feel, it’s the way they’ll feel forever. 
It seems kind of silly to say being a nerd, or a geek, is something that’s so deadly serious. To me, it is. Because if you’re intensely nerdy, or intensely geeky, you’ve found comfort in something (arguably too much) that gives you a positive feeling that the regular world hasn’t given you. The regular world has been the opposite kind of experience. And at times, you hide inside the geekiness, the nerddom that the Internet and your self-selected community affords. 
I’ve been reading so much about acceptance, about social justice, and those are all concepts and causes that are so incredibly important. But the depression, suicides, the violence and anger that comes from growing up a “loser” or a “nerd” can at times, be just as damaging. I wish at times, it wasn’t all articles on Doctor Who and Avengers and casting calls, and somewhere out there, there was some discussion about the obvious elephant in the room - that we’re all in pain, and that there are ways to feel better. 
For starters, if you have anxiety or suffer from general things like OCD or whatever, you should read up about how you can feel better. Like here. It’s a start. I wish I had more answers, but I’ve discovered that there aren’t more mechanisms, bc I don’t find a lot of people take it as seriously as they should. 
And this isn’t in any way something telling you that the things you love, the things we love as being nerds or geeks should be devalued. You can just also be healthier in the meantime. 
No idea what made me feel like talking about this. 

adamwarrock:

If I had it my way, the categorization of “nerd” or “geek” would be a protected class, would be on the tip of the tongue of everyone talking about social integration and comfort indices for students in high schools, colleges, job culture, etc. 

Because the culture and environment that raises “nerds or geeks” first, comes from a lifetime of isolation, loneliness, often stemming from a reaction from family trauma or great personal bullying and/or torment. They find comfort in culture, and find others who feel the same and quote the same jokes, reenact the same scenes, it’s not unlike religion - in that we find comfort in people who share our same passions, we feel less alone, as if there’s a whole world of people who are our friends after being convinced for so long that no one would ever be our friends. 

As a 33 year old person, I have terrible anxiety, social anxiety, OCD, at times agoraphobia, panic, and have the unfortunate ability to completely emotionally disconnect myself from any situation. Some of these things, I’ve only discovered I suffer from in the past 5 years of my life, long after I graduated any kind of school. I wish someone had been around to tell me that the things I suffered from were treatable, or rather, that the things I felt were normal. I wish there was some kind of mechanism for me to get help, rather than sift through a booklet of therapists, and read books and articles online to find ways to put myself through behavioral therapy and take active steps to making myself healthier. Not everyone has access to help. Not everyone has the initiative to take steps to be healthier. A lot of people sit and just assume that the way they feel, it’s the way they’ll feel forever. 

It seems kind of silly to say being a nerd, or a geek, is something that’s so deadly serious. To me, it is. Because if you’re intensely nerdy, or intensely geeky, you’ve found comfort in something (arguably too much) that gives you a positive feeling that the regular world hasn’t given you. The regular world has been the opposite kind of experience. And at times, you hide inside the geekiness, the nerddom that the Internet and your self-selected community affords. 

I’ve been reading so much about acceptance, about social justice, and those are all concepts and causes that are so incredibly important. But the depression, suicides, the violence and anger that comes from growing up a “loser” or a “nerd” can at times, be just as damaging. I wish at times, it wasn’t all articles on Doctor Who and Avengers and casting calls, and somewhere out there, there was some discussion about the obvious elephant in the room - that we’re all in pain, and that there are ways to feel better. 

For starters, if you have anxiety or suffer from general things like OCD or whatever, you should read up about how you can feel better. Like here. It’s a start. I wish I had more answers, but I’ve discovered that there aren’t more mechanisms, bc I don’t find a lot of people take it as seriously as they should. 

And this isn’t in any way something telling you that the things you love, the things we love as being nerds or geeks should be devalued. You can just also be healthier in the meantime. 

No idea what made me feel like talking about this. 

— theme